Commuter Courses

Do you live within driving distance of Duke University? Are you a high school student interested in earning college credit? Commuter options are available to local, academically qualified 10th and 11th grade students (2022-2023 school year)! Discover courses from across the arts & sciences and earn college credit alongside Duke undergraduates.

Term 2 classes meet from July 3 - August 13, 2023. Final exams are scheduled August 12 - 13, 2023.

The course list below is from 2022. Course options for 2023 will be available in early 2023.

Drawing as integrative tool where ideas and processes are explored and expanded through a variety of media. Still life, figure, landscape, architecture. Representation, abstraction, and working from imagination. Through problem solving within a range of projects, development of a visual language, and drawing skills to be applied to conceptual, visual, and technical disciplines.

Meeting Information

  • Days & Times: Monday, Tuesday, Thursday –12:30 p.m. -2:35 p.m.
  • Room: Smith Warehouse Bay 12 A200

Theoretical approaches to analyzing cultural beliefs and practices cross-culturally; application of specific approaches to case material from present and/or past cultures.

Meeting Information

  • Days & Times: Monday, Tuesday, Thursday –2:00 p.m. -4:05 p.m.
  • Room: Allen 326

Interdisciplinary examination of issues confronting American education, incorporating historical, political, economical, philosophical, and social perspectives. Exploration of ways cultural influences and differences have shaped public schools. Students participate in structured service learning experience in which they reflect on ethical issues related to schooling. Required participation in service-learning.

Meeting Information

  • Days & Times: Monday, Tuesday, Thursday –12:30 p.m. -2:35 p.m.
  • Room: Perkins LINK 065 (Classroom 2)

Biology/Advanced Placement Biology Recommended

The study of human origins, anatomy, and behavior from an evolutionary perspective. The historical development of pre-Darwinian evolutionary thinking and Darwin's contribution to evolutionary theory; genetics; microevolution and macroevolution; the modern synthesis framing the study of human origins and behavior in the context of modern evolutionary biology; primate behavioral ecology and evolution; a survey of primate and human paleontology, adaptation and variation; the origins of human social organization and culture; the impact of modern humans on biodiversity.

Meeting Information 

  • Days & Times: Monday, Tuesday, Thursday – 3:30 p.m. - 5:35 p.m. 
  • Room: Biological Sciences 063

Understanding the history and legacy of European imperialism is critical to making sense of the challenges of contemporary political life. To that end, this course introduces students to political theories of imperialism and provides a comparative historical analysis of several European empires. Through readings drawn from a diverse array of academic disciplines, it explores questions of nationalism, modernity race, religious pluralism, state formation, globalization, and international governance.

This course will be taught in a hybrid format. Students can either attend in-person or online.

Meeting Information

  • Days & Times: Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday, Friday – 9:30 a.m. - 10:45 a.m. 
  • Room: Allen 318

See the mathematics placement guide to determine eligibility

Second semester of introductory calculus with a laboratory component. Emphasis on laboratory projects, group work, and written reports. Methods of integration, applications of integrals, functions defined by integration, improper integrals, introduction to probability and distributions, infinite series, Taylor polynomials, series solutions of differential equations, systems of differential equations, Fourier series. Not open to students who have had Mathematics 122 or 122L. Prerequisite: Mathematics 106L or 111L (AP/IPC/PMC placement credit for Math 21 is not sufficient if Math 122L is offered) or consent. See the Department of Mathematics Math Advanced Placement Tests for more information. 

Meeting Information

  • Days & Times: Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday, Friday –8:45 a.m. -10:45 a.m.•\
  • Room: Physics 259

See the mathematics placement guide to determine eligibility

Partial differentiation, multiple integrals, and topics in differential and integral vector calculus, including Green's theorem, the divergence theorem, and Stokes's theorem. Not open to students who have taken Mathematics 202, 219, or 222. Prerequisite: Mathematics 22, 112L, 122, or 122L. See the Department of Mathematics Math Advanced Placement Tests for more information. 

Meeting Information

  • Days & Times: Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday, Friday –9:30 a.m. -10:45 a.m.
  • Room: Physics 047

Study of individual and group behaviors within organized settings and managerial strategies that enhance organizational effectiveness. Topics include leadership, culture and diversity, power and politics, communication, decision making, motivation and reward systems, conflict management, justice and ethics as well as organization structure and design. Special attention to critical assessment of new technological options in organizational settings with an aim to produce informed, ethical consumers and leaders.

Meeting Information

  • Days &Times: Monday, Tuesday, Thursday –2:00 p.m. -4:05 p.m.
  • Room: Perkins LINK 071 (Classroom 5)

Prerequisite: Advanced Placement Biology

This course will address philosophical problems around key concepts in evolutionary biology. We will ask, and attempt to answer, questions such as:

  • What is natural selection? What is the difference between natural selection and other causes of evolution, such as random genetic drift? Is natural selection a cause at all, or is it something else?
  • What is a gene? Do genomes provide the blueprints for development? Are genes necessary for evolution?
  • What is an organism? How do we distinguish one organism from another, especially in tightly integrated symbiotic relationships? Are our microbiomes distinct from us, or are individual humans really communities of different species?

Meeting Information

  • Days & Times: Monday, Tuesday, Thursday –12:30 p.m. -2:35 p.m.
  • Room: Perkins LINK 060 (Classroom 1)

Prerequisite: Advanced Placement Psychology

This course provides a broad overview of abnormal psychology. Areas of focus include: Reviewing different theoretical perspectives for conceptualizing abnormal behavior; Approaches to the diagnosis and assessment of psychopathology; Major classes of psychopathology including how they are defined and treated; Current research in the field of abnormal psychology. There is a research participation requirement for this course.

Meeting Information

  • Days & Times: Monday, Tuesday, Thursday –12:30 p.m. -2:35 p.m.
  • Room: Reuben-Cooke Building 127

Prerequisite: Advanced Placement Psychology 

The psychology of consumers and ways of influencing consumer behavior. How knowledge of consumer psychology and behavior is used to develop marketing techniques. How to use consumer psychology in making business decisions; the ethical issues associated with consumer influence. Prerequisite: Prior course in Psychology.

Meeting Information

  • Days & Times: Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday, Friday –11:00 a.m. -12:15 p.m.
  • Room:Reuben-Cooke Building 127

Prerequisite: Algebra 2 (NC Math 3)

Introduction to statistics as a science of understanding and analyzing data. Themes include data collection, exploratory analysis, inference, and modeling. Focus on principles underlying quantitative research in social sciences, humanities, and public policy. Research projects teach the process of scientific discovery and synthesis and critical evaluation of research and statistical arguments. Readings give perspective on why in 1950, S. Wilks said, "Statistical thinking will one day be as necessary a qualification for efficient citizenship as the ability to read and write." See department website for placement information. Not open to students who have taken Statistical Science 100 or above.

Meeting Information

  • Days & Times:
    • LECTURE: Monday, Tuesday, Thursday –12:30 p.m. -2:35 p.m.
    • LAB: Tuesday, Thursday –3:30 p.m. -4:45 p.m.
  • Room:LECTURE & LAB: Old Chemistry 003